The Roleplayer and Writer's Guide to Naming Conventions

Topic Tags:

An organized archive of roleplaying guides, including step-by-step, how-to, and general essays on theory.

Moderator: Scholars

Note: this is incomplete, but check back regularly for additions. This message will be removed when the rest of the article has been completed.
Updated as of February 2012.

The Roleplayer and Writer's Guide to Names

Ylanne S.

Presented by the RolePlayGateways Mentors Team




Table of Contents

Introduction

Section One
Naming Conventions by Ethnic Group/Nationality


Afghan Naming Conventions
Arabic Naming Conventions
Armenian Naming Conventions
Ancient Egyptian Naming Conventions
Ancient Roman Naming Conventions
Chinese Naming Conventions
Filipino Naming Conventions
Gaelic Naming Conventions
Greek Naming Conventions
Desi (Indian, Pakistani, Bengali, Nepali) Naming Conventions
Japanese Naming Conventions
Korean Naming Conventions
Kurdish Naming Conventions
Latino Naming Conventions
Medieval European Naming Conventions
Native American Naming Conventions
Nigerian Naming Conventions
North African Naming Conventions
Persian/Iranian Naming Conventions
Russian Naming Conventions
Scandinavian Naming Conventions
Slavic Naming Conventions
Southeast Asian (Laos, Burma, Vietnam) Naming Conventions
Thai Naming Conventions
Turkic Naming Conventions
Western European Naming Conventions

Section Two
Naming Conventions by Religion


Ba'hai Naming Conventions
Buddhist Naming Conventions
Christian Naming Conventions
Hindu Naming Conventions
Islamic Naming Conventions
Jain Naming Conventions
Jewish Naming Conventions
Sikh Naming Conventions
Wiccan Naming Conventions

Section Three
Contemporary Patterns of Naming Conventions in America


First and Second Generation Non-Western European Immigrants
"Americanized" Names for Foreigners
"Ghetto" Names
African-American Names
Surnames as Forenames
Nicknames and Diminutives
Screennames
Pseudonyms (Stage Names, Pen Names)
Name Changes (Religious Converts, Gender Neutral Movement, Witness Protection, Marriage, etc.)

Appendices

Appendix A: Footnotes and citations
Appendix B: Other resources





Introduction


Many roleplayers and writers are interested in writing about characters who hail from other parts of the world than the Occident (the West), and one important aspect of creating such a character is the name. Names have an inherent sense of power to them. In China, for example, it is extremely rare for any two children to be given the same personal name, whereas in America, names are ranked based on popularity in the thousands, or even millions, of individuals who bear them. In the Torah and the Christian New Testament, narratives of births are often accompanied by an explanation for the child's name, which is usually related to the circumstances of birth or to a prophecy.

Dymaxion Q wrote:The Akan peoples of Ghana believe that your name indicates your purpose and mission on earth. Tibetans believe that illness is caused by an inappropriate name and that the acquirement of a new name was the cure. In ancient Egypt, a person’s name was so important that it was believed the blotting out of a name would cause the person and their after life to be destroyed. In Ashkenazic Judaism—much retained by American Jews—parents would not name a child after an older living resident as a precaution to prevent the “Death Angel” from taking the younger person’s life before its time.


All names have meanings, and you may even know what language your name comes from, or what it means. Ylanne, for example, is a Hebrew name meaning "oak tree" (though it is usually spelled "Elan" or "Ilan"). This is the same across time and cultural boundaries.

While the first and foremost purpose of a name is to uniquely identify one person from the one next to him, names -- either forenames or surnames -- tend to fall into one of four primary categories:

Descriptive
Descriptive names are given to emphasize a visible aspect of a person's appearance (or an ancestor's appearance), or a desired personality trait or characteristic. Examples include Barbarossa ("red beard" in Italian), Lamiya ("dark" in Arabic), Little, Weiss ("white" in German), Abdul Haq ("servant of the truth" in Arabic), Xinzhen ("precious pearl" in Chinese), Esperanza ("hope" in Spanish), and Miriam ("wished-for child" in Hebrew).

Origin
Origin names provide general or specific information about the person's hometown, homeland, or general area where he is from. Examples include al-Tikriti (denoting someone from Tikrit, Iraq), Da Vinci (denoting someone from the town of Vinci, Italy), Poole, al-Falesteen (someone from Palestine), al-Misri (someone from Egypt), al-Farsi (someone who is Persian), and Lake.

Occupational
Occupation names reveal an individual's occupation (or that of his ancestor, or one that has been practiced for several generations in his family). Examples include Sawyer (someone who saws wood), Walker (someone who shrinks wool), Fletcher (someone who makes arrows), Alim (scholar), Faisal (a judge), or Schuhmacher (someone who makes shoes).

Familial
Familial names are typically patryonimics, which reveal the name of a male ancestor -- father, grandfather, or distant ancestor -- but may also reveal the name of a female ancestor, or another relative. Examples include Williamson (William's son), McDonald (Irish Gaelic for "Donald's son"), MacDonald (Scottish Gaelic for "Donald's son"), Nikolayevich (Russian for "Nikolay's son"), Binhamid (Arabic for "Hamid's son"), and Hernández (Spanish for "Hernan's son").

Where naming conventions may differ, however, are in the exact form of a name, the purpose for its meaning, and the stylistic characteristics of it. Typically, these differences are drawn along lines of region, ethnic group, language, and religion. One prominent example of differing naming conventions is between most European names and Arab names. While traditional European names consist of a surname and one or more forenames, there are no surnames in Arab names. Because of these differences in naming conventions, many roleplayers and writers either make the mistake of creating an incorrectly formatted name, or are reticent to choose an ethnic name for fear that they will make such fallacies.

This guide is provided as a basic outline to the naming conventions of a number of ethnic groups, regions, and religions, to offer a resource to roleplayers and writers looking for accurate information about naming conventions. The etymology and conventions of names are a special interest of mine, and it is with this passion that I offer the following for your use. I only ask that if you quote any part of this guide, you provide a proper, clear citation, and kindly inform me of the location or manner of its use. For questions about the naming conventions of another religion or ethnic group not included here, or for clarification regarding any of the existing entries, you may contact me via PM.




Section One
Naming Conventions by Ethnic Group/Nationality


Afghan Naming Conventions


In Afghanistan, the primary ethnic groups are Pashtun, Tajik (including Farsiwan), and Ḥazāra, and each ethnic group speaks its own language. The primary languages spoken in Afghanistan are Pashtu, Dari (or Tajiki), and Hazaragi; however, other languages may also be spoken depending on the region.

Out of respect, Afghans address older persons with honorary titles in place of their given names, including. Some of these include the following:

South Eastern Region Migrant Resource Centre wrote:“Baba” for Dad, “A’de “for Mum,
“Kaka” for brother of the father, “Mama” for the brother of the mother, “khala” for the
sister of the mother, “Ama” for the sister of the father. In general all women are called “Khore”.


Because of the demographics of the nation and the prevalence of Islam as the majority religion, many Afghan forenames are derived from Persian or Arab ones, especially for males, whose names often reflect Islamic values and ideals. (See Persian/Iranian Naming Conventions, Arabic Naming Conventions, and Islamic Naming Conventions below, for more information on these naming conventions).

The exception is Pashtun names. Pashtuns tend to use exclusively Pashtu names, consisting of two words -- a forename and a name which denotes tribal origin (and is used in the same way as a surname when traveling to the Western hemisphere, as Afghans do not traditionally have surnames.) Examples of tribal names include: Mohammedzai, Durrani, Khudiadadzai, Khalilzad, Marwat, Achakzai, or Ahmadzai. Women typically take the tribal name of their fathers, or their husbands, when they marry. Exames of forenames include Ariana, Banafsha, Nazo, and Rayan (for females), and Chinar, Droon, Pason, and Shuja (for males).

As a side note, the name "Khan" in Afghan usage is an honorific name given to someone in a position of authority, in addition to their already-existing name. Many Afghans, particularly inside the country, do not have surnames.

Arabic Naming Conventions


Names that follow these conventions are typically only given to children born in an Arab country or to Arab parents. Arabic forenames are often given to children in any Muslim family, and Arabic forenames are often adopted by converts to the religion of Islam, but these conventions strictly apply to people of Arab ethnicity and are rarely used by non-Arabs in this specific form. Arabic is spoken throughout North Africa, the Levant, and the Gulf. Arabic speaking nations include Morocco, Tunisia, Sudan, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, Palestine, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Yemen, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, and Kuwait.

Arabic names traditionally have four parts: ism, nasab, laqab, and nisba. The ism is a personal name, typically but not always a descriptive name (which is also usually a word used in everyday speech), which may or may not be accompanied by a laqab, which is intended as a further descriptive (and must be a descriptive name). The ism may be replaced with a kunya, or a diminutive in which a person is addressed as the father or mother of his or her firstborn son rather than by his or her own given name.

The nasab consists of at least one patryonimic denoting direct male ancestry, but there is no limit on the number of patryonimics permitted (and there may be several nasab, denoting father, grandfather, great-grandfather, great-great grandfather, etc.). The nasab is the male ancestor's name, and typically includes "bin" or "ibn" (son of) or "bint" (daughter of) preceding the ancestor's name. In contemporary usage, many individuals choose to omit "ibn" or "bin", instead using just their ancestors' proper names.

The nisba is the closest concept to a surname in Arabic naming conventions. It is an occupational, origin, or familial name, which is passed on for many generations. For example, Usama bin Ladin's name is Usama bin Mohammed bin 'Awad bin Ladin, where Mohammed was his father, 'Awad his grandfather, and Ladin a nisba, referring to a distant ancestor. The nisba also serves a grammatical function. Outside of a naming context, the nisba is a particular form of adjective or adjectival noun derived from another noun. For example, Misr means Egypt, and Misri can mean either "Egyptian" the adjective or "an Egyptian," as a noun. It can also be used as the nisba part of a name, as in Shihabuddin Abu al-'Abbas Ahmad ibn an-Naqib al-Misri.

Here is another example. One of my characters' names is Tahira Ali Almontaser. She has no nasab in her name, but that is okay because she is not ethnically Arab; however, Tahira is an ism, and Ali is a laqab. Almontaser is technically a nisba. She commonly uses the abbreviated Tahira Ali as her name for general purposes, omitting the nisba altogether in favor of the laqab, which is used like a surname.

The last notes in this section are to help you avoid common mistakes for non-native Arabic speakers.

Like with the names Mark John or Mary Ellen, which are full first names -- one name, consisting of two words -- any name that begins with "Abd" is a two word name that cannot be separated into its components. Abdal Malik and Abd al-Noor are two examples of such names. "Abd" is a word that means "servant or slave of," and without the second half of the name, it is incomplete and inaccurate. If someone's name is given as Jamal Abdal Malik, it is wrong to address him is "Mr. Malik." Instead, one must use "Mr. Abdal Malik."

When writing Arabic words or names with the Latin alphabet (romanizing or transliterating), there is no one standard system used and applied broadly across all disciplines and by all people who render Arabic names with the Latin alphabet. Thus, there may be several ways to spell any given Arabic name. For example -- Mohamed, Mohammed, Muhammad, Mohamet, Muhamad; Noor, Nur, Nour, Nor; Abdulrahman, Abd-al-Rahman, Abdal Rahman, Abdur Rahman, Abd al-Rahman, Abd-ul-Rahman, Abd-ur-Rahman, Abd ur-Rahman, Abdurrahman, Abd ul-Rahman, Abdelrahman, Abdel Rahman. While you can take some liberties with the spelling of Arabic names, it is advisable to perform a simple search of the desired spelling to see whether there are real people who do, in fact, use that spelling of the name.

Armenian Naming Conventions


The Armenian language has no directly correlated languages (unlike the Romance languages, the Turkic languages, or the Semitic languages), and the majority religion of the nation of Armenia is Eastern Christianity. Armenians often have familial surnames, or patryonimics, which reveal either the name of the person's father or a distant ancestor. These are formed by taking a proper name and appending the suffix "ian" (Western Armenian) or "yan" (Eastern European), as in Hagopian, Pashayan, Ayvazian, Demirjian, or Nahigian. (On occasion, the suffix "jan" will be seen.) Forenames may be traditional Armenian forenames, or for the American-born, they may be any non-Armenian forename.

Ancient Egyptian Naming Conventions


Ancient Egyptian names were carefully chosen, and many included the name of a God (or a reference to a god whose name is implied), for both commoners and nobility. Names where the god's name is implied are those with meanings such as "whom god loves", referring to a specific but unnamed deity as opposed to "god" in the abstract sense. Other names were nouns or adjectives, in the style of descriptive names. In addition, according to Jefferson Monet, "common words or phrases were often used in names. These included ankh (life), mery (beloved), hotep (peace), nefer (beautiful) and khenemet (one who is joined with)".

Jefferson Monet wrote:Names for non-royal individuals often followed those of the rulers of the time, and often incorporated the name of a deity chosen either because they were pre-eminent at that period or were locally important in the place where the individual was born. Hence, the name of an individual is frequently a clue as to the date or geographical region in which he was born.


Ancient Egyptians used a two-name system, in which the first name was the formally given name (often a name used in past generations of the same family), and the second name the one used on an everyday basis for identification. Furthermore, many names were unisex, given to both males and females, and Mr. Monet further explains: "[The suffix] "et" on the end of a name, or sometimes in the middle of it, appears to have been a feminine identifier, and "pa-sheri" (masculine) or "ta-sherit" (feminine) was somewhat similar to the equivalent of "Junior" today. We also find Si, meaning son, or Sit, meaning daughter."

Ancient Roman Naming Conventions


Note that these naming conventions only apply to persons who were born during the Ancient Roman era, during the Republic and Imperial Eras of Rome, and not to modern Italians. Another note is that anyone who became a Roman citizen typically dropped their given name in favor of a correctly formatted Roman name, as described below, as an outward identifier of Roman nationality.

Male Romans, during the Republic and Empire, typically had three part names. They consisted of a praenomen, a nomen (sometimes nomel gentile or gentilicium), and cognomen. (Sometimes additional cognomina, called agnomen, were added.) Female Romans were given the feminine form of their father's nomen, the genitive case of their father (or husband's) cognomen, and sometimes a name denoting birth order among sisters.

The praenomen is a given name, and it was chosen by the parents. The male head of the family often named sons after himself. Furthermore, unlike with modern names, there were very few possible praenomina to choose from, and all names were excessively common, especially within the same family. Examples are Gaius, Publius, Titus, and Livius.

The nomen indicates the gens, or the collection of families sharing the same nomen. It is usually in the masculine form in a man's name, and some examples are: Aemilius, Claudius, Lucretius, Domitius, Julius, Horatius, Pompeius, Servilius, Didius and Valerius. It is less unique than the cognomen which follows it, and is a broader category than the cognomen.

The cognomen identifies smaller family groups within any particular gens. Originally used as a nickname of sorts, like the Arabic laqab, to distinguish individuals with the same names, they became hereditary by the Republic period, passed on through the father's line. Some cognomina are Caesar, Aquila, Marcellus, and Severus.

Additional cognomina, called agnomina, may be added for one of three typical reasons: When one is adopted, he takes the name of his adoptive father, but adopts a cognomen denoting his original lineage, formed from the stem of his prior nomen with -ianus affixed to the end. Another reason would be for honorifics, when an agnomen is given to compliment an individual's achievement or status. Lastly, some Romans might use an addtional cognomen as a matronym denoting descent through the mother's line, such as in cases where siblings have different mothers. These are formed by replacing the ending of the mother's name with -ianus or -inus.

Chinese Naming Conventions


Chinese names typically consist of a two part name, a surname and a forename, which are traditionally given in that order. (i.e. Zhang Huiye, in which Zhang is the family name, and Huiye the forename). It is important to note, however, that many Chinese write or give their names in the opposite, Westernized order (forename, surname, i.e. Huiye Zhang), especially those who travel or study abroad.

There are one hundred surnames that are extremely common throughout China and Chinese-descended people, and which represent a significant percentage of the population. Common surnames include Li, Zhang, Leung, and Huang. (The single most common surname in all the world is also the most common Chinese surname: Zhang or Chang). Like with Arabic names, there is no one universal system for the Romanization of Chinese characters and phonetics, and the same name may be spelled in different ways, depending on the family or individual's preference, or the spelling of an immigration official.

Forenames are typically two character names (which is usually also two syllables). The first character is often a generational marker which is the same for all siblings in a family of a single generation, and the second is unique to the individual. Together, the two characters of the forename have a specially chosen meaning. It is not uncommon, however, for forenames to consist of a single character as opposed to two, and in some cases, this is considered a desirable form.

As in most cultures, names are incredibly important and represent more than just a legal requirement for identification, but are a part of one's identity and existence as a person. As a consequence, forenames in China are unique and rarely shared between individuals, unlike in America, where names like Michael and Jessica are exceedingly common. If forenames happen to be shared, it is usually with very, very few individuals (few enough to fit into a single small room) across the country.

On occasion, especially with religious or ethnic minorities, Chinese names will vary from the traditional two or three character name to be much longer. Foreigners adopting Chinese names or a Chinese-sounding phonetically similar version of their own name ought to be wary of these naming conventions.

Gaelic (or Druidic) Naming Conventions


Gaelic names consist of a forename and a surname. The most common

Greek Naming Conventions
Desi (Indian, Pakistani, Bengali, Nepali) Naming Conventions
Japanese Naming Conventions
Korean Naming Conventions
Kurdish Naming Conventions
Latino Naming Conventions
Medieval European Naming Conventions
Native American Naming Conventions
Nigerian Naming Conventions
North African Naming Conventions
Persian/Iranian Naming Conventions
Russian Naming Conventions
Scandinavian Naming Conventions
Slavic Naming Conventions
Southeast Asian (Laos, Burma, Vietnam) Naming Conventions
Thai Naming Conventions
Turkic Naming Conventions




Section Two
Naming Conventions by Religion


Ba'hai Naming Conventions

Buddhist Naming Conventions


Buddhism was founded in India by a prince named Siddhartha Gautama, who taught the Four Noble Truths that could lead one to nirvana, or escape from the constant cycle of rebirths into a life of suffering and pain. Today, Buddhism is prevalent throughout Asia, and has experienced growing popularity in the West. Its adherents are typically divided into Theravadan Buddhists and Mahayana Buddhists.

In the Theravada tradition, prominent in Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, names are given in the Pali liturgical language, and are usually based on the day, month, and zodiac year of the baby's birth. Names may also be phonetically similar to that of immediate family, or given in honor of nature.

In the Mahayana tradition, a dharma name, or name of refuge, is given to anyone who is ordained as a monk or a nun, and this name replaces the given name for as long as the individual remains a monastic. A similar tradition is followed in the Theravada tradition.

Christian Naming Conventions


Christianity is a monotheistic religion that was founded in the first century by the self-proclaimed "Son of God", Jesus, and expanded upon by the apostle Paul in the epistles of the New Testament. Founded in what was then Palestine, Christianity rapidly spread throughout the Middle East and Southeastern Europe, eventually gaining converts worldwide. Today, Christianity is most prominent in Africa, South America, and the United States. Historically, Christianity dominated all of the Western World. Christians are divided into three primary sects: Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Protestant. With the exception of Roman Catholicism, each of these has innumerable sub-sects with subtle variations in interpretation of religious texts and doctrine, as well as practices.

Christian families often name their children after persons mentioned in the Bible, both Old and New Testament. Jewish names are often given in Westernized forms, such as Jeremiah (Yirmiyahu), Johanne (Yochanan), John (Yochanan), Joshua (Yashua), and Mary (Miriam). This is true across the globe, for Christians in Africa, Europe, South America, and Asia. Oftentimes a forename such as Jeremiah or Peter is juxtaposed with an ethnically congruent surname, such as John Mugabo, or Sarah Massaquoi.

Hindu Naming Conventions


Hinduism is one of the oldest religions in the world, having no one individual as founder. The Vedic rites are generally practiced in India, with minority populations in Bangladesh and Pakistan, as well as a large immigrant community in the West. A polytheistic religion originally developed in India, Hindu adherents would later give rise to Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. Today, Hinduism figures politically with civil war in Sri Lanka, where Hindu and Buddhist extremists fight with terrorist tactics for religious control of the nation.

Children are often given forenames that are the names of various gods or goddesses, in honor of that particular deity. For instance, Lakshmi, the name of a goddess of fertility, is also a common girl's name.

Islamic Naming Conventions


Islam is a monotheistic religion that was founded in the seventh century by the Arabian prophet Muhammad, in the tradition of the Abrahamic faiths, along with Judaism and Christianity. Founded in what is today Saudi Arabia, Islam spread throughout the Middle East, North Africa, Eurasia, and Southeast Asia in three primary empires: the Mughal Empire, the Safavid Empire, and the Turkish Empire. Today, Islam has more than one billion adherents worldwide, with Indonesia having the highest percentage of Muslims. Islam is widely practiced in North and Eastern Africa, the Middle East, and Southeast Asia. Muslims are divided into three primary schools of thought: Sunni, Shia, and Sufi. Within each, there are many specific schools of thought, such as Wahhabism (the State religion of Saudi Arabia), Ismaili Shia, and Twelver Shia.

Muslim children are often given Arabic forenames without regard to their own national origin. This is true throughout North Africa, Europe, the Americas, and Asia. With few exceptions, names of the prophets, the wives of Muhammad, and the companions of the prophet Muhammad are exceedingly common, as are Arabic names without religious connotation. Arabic names following the "Abd - " formula (see Arabic Naming Conventions, above) are also common, as signs of an individual's faith. These names are often given without regard to traditional Arabic language naming conventions, when the child's family is not of Arab origin.

Jewish Naming Conventions


Judaism is a monotheistic religion that was founded thousands of years ago by the patriarch Abraham (who is common to Islam and Christianity as well), its laws cemented by the prophet Moses. Founded in the Fertile Crescent region, Judaism was initially confined to a small area in the Levant before its adherents dispersed throughout the Mesopotamian region and the Greater Middle East, eventually spreading in a series of diasporas worldwide. Jews today fall into two primary ethno-religious categories: Askenazi Jews, who hail from Central and Eastern Europe; and Sephardic Jews, who hail from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal), and which also includes Mizrahi Jews, who hail from throughout the Middle East. Jews are divided into Orthodox, Conservative, Reform, and Reconstructionist Judaism, with several subcategories and schools of thought within the four primary movements.

These naming conventions may be applicable both to religiously observant and secular Jewish families; however, unlike most of the ethnic naming conventions, are not strictly followed, and allow for much broader interpretation.

The surnames of Jews are often indicators of an individual's family history -- what nation he or she is from, for example. A "Joshua Goldblatt" is likely of German Jewish origin, whereas an Asher Cardozo is a Sephardic Jew (from the Iberian peninsula, either Spain or Portugal). Sephardic Jews often name their children after their own grandparents, whereas Ashkenazic Jews never name children after living relatives. Forenames may reflect the family's location -- for instance German Jews might have German names, whereas Spanish and Portuguese Jews commonly have Spanish and Portuguese names. These are often in addition to a Hebrew name used for liturgical purposes or as a middle name.

Sikh Naming Conventions


Wiccan Naming Conventions







Section Three
Contemporary Patterns of Naming Conventions in America


First and Second Generation Non-Western European Immigrants
"Americanized" Names for Foreigners
"Ghetto" Names
African-American Names
Surnames as Forenames
Nicknames and Diminutives
Screennames
Pseudonyms (Stage Names, Pen Names)
Name Changes (Religious Converts, Gender Neutral Movement, Witness Protection, Marriage, etc.)



Appendices


Appendix A: Footnotes and citations


Burch, Norah. 13 December 2007. Occupational Surnames. Unusual, Unique, & Creative Names.

Coat of Arms and Family Crest Store. 12 July 2010. Occupational Surnames.

The Cultural Orientation Project. Afghans: Their History and Culture.

Dymaxion Q: A Universe of Random Thoughts. 29 March 2007.[url=http://dymaxionq.wordpress.com/2007/03/29/the-name-game-thoughts-on-the-african-american-naming-quandry-in-the-21st-century/].

Keller, Dominique. Theravada Buddhist Baby Naming Ceremony.

The Khyber Gateway. Pashto Names for Children.

The Khyber Gateway. Paxtun Tribes.

Mills Baker, Dillard. 30 March 2008. Naming Conventions.

Monet, Jefferson. 2010. Ancient Egyptian Names.

Mphande, Lupenga. 2006. Naming and Linguistic Africanisms in African American Culture. In Selected Proceedings of the 35th Annual Conference on African Linguistics, ed. John Mugane et al., 104-113. Somerville, MA: Cascadilla Proceedings Project.

Nova Roman Censores. 18 February 2009. Choosing a Roman Name.

South Eastern Region Migrant Resource Centre. November 2009.Afghanity Community Profile -- older people.

Wikipedia. Roman Naming Conventions.




Appendix B: Other resources
User avatar
Ylanne
Member for 6 years



Quite interesting. I mean, I'm probably not going to use most of this, but it is always handy to have a little extra knowledge and choice for your character's names, especially if you have a lot. Perhaps you can do one for places also? I think that'd be very useful to many GM's.
Do you come from a land down under?
Where women glow and men plunder?
Can't you hear, can't you hear the thunder?
You better run, you better take cover.
User avatar
Kestrel
Member for 6 years


I may, if there is enough interest. The naming of places, buildings, artifacts, weapons, personal items, municipalities, and states is similar but quite different from the naming of people! It is also a fascinating topic, and if enough people are interested in learning, I would consider writing a similar article on the naming of such things. Although, if you have any specific questions about locale names, though, I'd be happy to answer them.
User avatar
Ylanne
Member for 6 years


Well done Ylanne, a nice concise piece of work that will be beneficial to anyone who chooses to utilize it.
The writer who cares more about words than about characters, action, setting, atmosphere is unlikely to create a vivid and continuous dream; he gets in his own way too much; in his poetic drunkenness, he can't tell the cart- and its cargo- from the horse.
John Gardner



Image

Skallagrim
Contributor
Member for 7 years


It is interesting to note that when introducing yourself in Latin, the phrase is not "My name is..." but rather "The name given to me is...". This distinction is important; when someone was born, they would bring it before the patriarch of the house and place it on the ground. He then had the option of either picking up the child and giving it a name, whereupon it would become part of the family, or refusing to pick it up and essentially leave it to die in the wilderness.

Just another example of how a language can reflect the culture of the people that use it. :3

Edit: Another self-introduction grammatical construct would be French, where "J'ai m'apelle..." translates to "I call myself..."
The war has ended for now and peace has been restored. But those who sacrificed themselves for the victory will never return. Exhausted, X gazes at the destruction he helped cause and wonders why he chose to fight. Was there another way?

Standing on the cliff, the answers seem to escape him. He only knows that he'll fight the Mavericks again before he finds his answer.

How long will he keep on fighting? How long will his pain last? Maybe only the X-Buster on his hand knows for sure...
User avatar
qbsuperstar03
Member for 6 years


Oh no, nothing specific, I'm just generally interested.
User avatar
Kestrel
Member for 6 years


I do intend to continue updating this page until it is completed. (Out of curiosity, though, who rated me a one and why?)
User avatar
Ylanne
Member for 6 years


Ylanne, would you like me to write out the Russian naming conventions? I am extremely well versed in them.
Image
•civilization begins with order, grows with liberty and dies with chaos

My Roleplays
Without Absolution- a civilization on the brink of destruction
User avatar
UnderINK
Member for 7 years



Post a reply

RolePlayGateway is a site built by a couple roleplayers who wanted to give a little something back to the roleplay community. The site has no intention of earning any profit, and is paid for out of their own pockets.

If you appreciate what they do, feel free to donate your spare change to help feed them on the weekends. After selecting the amount you want to donate from the menu, you can continue by clicking on PayPal logo.